Upcoming Events

Oct 06, 2020

'The Astrographic Catalogue and the Women who measured the stars'

Annual General Meeting followed by presentation

Take part in Sydney City Skywatchers 125th Annual General Meeting. You will elect your committee, and hear the Presidents address. Then find out about the Sun's activity with Monty Leventhal AM and explore why the Great Star Catalogue (also known as the Astrographic Catalogue) created a new labour force of women who measured the stars with Toner Stevenson. 

BIO

Dr Toner Stevenson is current president of Sydney City Skywatchers, past manager of Sydney Observatory and currently Manager of the School of Philosophical and Historical Inquiry and Honorary Affiliate at the University of Sydney. She has 35 years of Museum experience and for her doctoral thesis she investigated Australia's participation in the Astrographic Catalogue. She is passionate about  hidden histories of science in Australia and the preservation of heritage.

Date: Wednesday 7 October 2020

Time: 6:30pm

How to join: Members will be sent a Zoom invitation. If you are not a member please email: secretary@sydneycityskywatchers.org.au

Sep 06, 2020

The Pan-STARRS search for Near-Earth Objects

Presented by Richard Wainscoat from Hawaii

Earth continues to be hit by asteroids and comets. Fortunately, impacts by larger objects are rare. The Pan-STARRS Telescopes on Haleakala, Maui, Hawaii, search the sky nightly for Near-Earth Objects (NEOs), and have become the most prolific discovery telescopes for larger NEOs. I will briefly describe the NEO survey, and will discuss some of the recent discoveries from Pan-STARRS.

Dr Richard Wainscoat is leading the search for Near Earth Objects with the Pan-STARRS telescopes atop Haleakala on Maui. He grew up in Australia, studying physics at the University of Western Australia, then receiving his PhD in astronomy from the Australian National University. He was attracted to Hawaii by the excellent observatory sites on Mauna Kea and Haleakala, and the powerful telescopes that are located atop those mountains. He began his career by studying the structure of galaxies, then later switched fields to study Near-Earth Objects. Near-Earth Objects are asteroids and comets that come relatively close to Earth. Impacts from larger objects will have catastrophic consequences to life on Earth, so worldwide efforts are now being made to find any objects that may hit Earth in the future so that they can be deflected. He now leads the Near-Earth Object search program with the Pan-STARRS telescopes on Haleakala. Pan-STARRS is presently the leading discoverer of Near-Earth Objects, and also discovers more than half of all new comets. He is also a photographer and an astrophotographer and arguably has one of the most important jobs on our planet.

Date: Monday 7 September

Time: 6:30pm (join in via Zoom at 6:20pm)

How: Members will be emailed a Zoom link prior.

Non-members can attend. Please email sydneycityskywatchers@gmail.com at least 24 hours prior. Your Zoom profile must show your name when you are admitted by the host. After the event we hope you will be keen to become a member so you can access future events and, when Covid-19 conditions permit, telescope viewing. 

Aug 02, 2020

Alice Gorman - The archaeology of our solar system

In over 60 years of space exploration, humanity has left objects and traces strewn from Earth orbit to interstellar space. They form an archaeological record that we can interrogate for what it tells us about human engagement with space beyond Earth. These spacecraft and places – such as the Apollo 11 landing site on the Moon – are also our cultural heritage. Taking a heritage perspective means seeing this record as far more than just discarded junk. It speaks directly to how we can make sense of our place in the solar system.

 

 

Bio

Dr Alice Gorman is an internationally recognised leader in the field of space archaeology. Her research focuses on the archaeology and heritage of space exploration, including space junk, planetary landing sites, off-earth mining, space habitats, rocket launch pads and antennas. She is an Associate Professor at Flinders University in Adelaide and a heritage consultant with over 25 years’ experience working with Indigenous communities in Australia. In collaboration with NASA and Chapman University, she is conducting the first archaeological study of the International Space Station. She is a mentor in the UN Office of Outer Space Affairs Space4Women Mentor Network. Her book Dr Space Junk vs the Universe: Archaeology and the Future (MIT Press, 2019) won the NIB Literary Award People’s Choice for Non-Fiction and the John Mulvaney Book Award. She tweets as @drspacejunk and blogs at Space Age Archaeology.

Date: Monday 3 August

Time: 6:30pm (join in via Zoom at 6:20pm)

How: Members will be emailed a Zoom link prior.

Non-members can attend. Please email sydneycityskywatchers@gmail.com at least 24 hours prior. Your Zoom profile must show your name when you are admitted by the host. After the event we hope you will be keen to become a member so you can access future events and, when Covid-19 conditions permit, telescope viewing. 

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